Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning

Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning

 “And as we are all connected beneath the surface, our individual pebbles of consciousness may send ripples to the furthest shores.” Pierre Lumineau

The use of computers in the arts has led in the last two decades to the need of a different naming: new media art, computer art, virtual art, immaterial art, interactive art, telematic art. All are definitions that do not refer to a mean of expression, as in the plastic arts, but rather a preferential and significant use of technology and software that have occurred in recent years. Each of these, changing the technological reality and the media landscape, allowed to investigate new technical researches and new perceptive landscapes.

Today two seem to be the most used definitions, multimedia art and digital art, which both refer to strong realities: the convergence of languages through the digital medium and the incorporation in the digital medium of conceptual elements and languages previously expressed by different media, first through a long experimental process and now suddenly placed together in the digital medium. The exhibition Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning is the first of five chapters held at the Swiss Institute in Milan, dedicated to reflection on the digital and its inevitable consequences on the artistic production of our times. This first chapter of the project has been curated by Melanie Bühler, founder and curator of Lunch Bytes, and Valerio Mannucci, co-founder and co-editor of NERO.

Reflecting on the abstraction and pervasive force that today digital objects and their representations have, the exhibition presents the work of six European artists: Philippe Decrauzat (CH), Harm van den Dorpel (NL), Katharina Fengler (D / CH), Femke Herregraven (NL), Lars Holdhus (N) and Pierre Lumineau (CH). The work  A square, by Philippe Decrauzat, acts as a catalyst for all the other works on show and consists of a grid in black and white that covers most of the exhibition space, inviting the viewer in a physical immersion. Incompatibility Representation by Harm van den Dorpel, in which we see plastic structures similar to nodes, explores various choices of a system that self-evolves, as if the whole reality looked like a huge database. The “triptych” installation by Lars Holdhus originated by the dissecting of an Algorithmic process of reading a painting, refers to the way computers read visual information and process images.

The works by Katharina Fengler do, however, refer to the way consumer products can become objects of desire, combining together attractive images of chocolate bars with the abstraction of airbrushed watercolors. Rogue Waves by Herregraven consists of a series of metal bars engraved, each of them carving the signs of a particular transaction, connected to a specific event, in which the algorithms have illegally manipulated the financial markets through the swelling of prices. Finally, the text of Lumineau, which introduces the exhibition, is a written interpretation of the main theme, implemented using a reductionist language similar to the one used browsing online.

The exhibition, on view at the Swiss Institute in Milan from 15 May to 13 June 2015, open Monday to Friday from 11 to 18 and on Saturdays from 14 to 18, is accompanied by a website www.inflected-objects.com, which will also feature the following chapters of the project and where the content will be gradually updated.

Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

Installation View, Inflected Objects #1: Abstraction – Rising Automated Reasoning, Istituto Svizzero Milano, 2015. Photo: Emanuele Biondi

The following two tabs change content below.

Eleonora Gargantini

Una Laurea Magistrale in Storia dell'Arte in tasca e la necessità di mettere nero su bianco la mia creatività mi hanno portata a scrivere su Juliet Art Magazine e su altre riviste on-line riguardanti il settore artistico. Amante degli aspetti semplici, ma non banali della vita, cerco il sublime in un cielo plumbeo prima di un temporale estivo, e non so resistere alla dolcezza di una crostata alla marmellata di mirtilli.

Leave a Reply